Top 52 Quotes & Sayings by Charlie Cox

Explore popular quotes and sayings by an English actor Charlie Cox.
Charlie Cox

Charlie Thomas Cox is an English actor. He is best known for portraying Matt Murdock / Daredevil in the television series Daredevil (2015–2018), and The Defenders (2017), the film Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021), and Echo (2023) alongside the animated show Spider-Man: Freshman Year (2024).

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Actions Actor Actors Actress Acts Admire Admit Afraid Ages Ally Hide All America Anger Architecture Asked Attribute Audience Audition Awards Back Bad Actions Bad People Barely Based Basically Be Happy Belief Belief Systems Believes Benefit Bigger Bigger Picture Boardwalk Boardwalk Empire Brain Brain Injury Bring Bringing Britain Capable Captain Carbohydrates Cardio Care Career Catholic Catholicism Caused Celebrity Champion Character Characters Charlie Charming Choose Chorus Claire Closely Comfortable Comics Complex Confidence Connected Consideration Contract Convictions Cool Country Courage Cowboys Crazy Criticism Damage Danger Daredevil Day Life Decisions Deeply Defend Devoid Difficulties Docks Dose Doubt Doubts Drama Drama School Drawn Dream Dreamed Driving Dundee Easy Elements Emotional Emotional Response Emotions Empire Encourages England English Entertain Entertain People Everyday Everyday Life Evil Exercise Experience Fact Fail Fairy Fairy Tale Fairy Tales Faith Fallible Falling Fame Famous Fans Fascinated Favorite Fear Feel Feeling Fell Felt Fight Fight Scene Film Film And Television Film Industry Films Find Footage Forget Friend Front Generation Give Glorification Good Good Enough Grateful Great Great Thing Great Things Grew Grew Up Grow Grow Up Grown Guilt Hang Happy Hear Helpful Heroes Heroic Highlight Hindsight History Holds Honesty Horrible House I Care I Love New York Idea Imagine Impressionable In Fact Incapable Incredibly Industry Ingrained Initial Injury Interesting Iron Iron Man Issue Jerusalem Justice Kind Knew Land Lawyer Learn Left Lenient Life Lines Live London Long Long Period Long Periods Of Time Love Lovely Loving Luck Macbeth Main Make Make Believe Makes Mark Marvel Matt Mind Mindset Misconception Miss Moment Moments Move Movie Muscle Musical Musicals My Favorite My Life Naturally Necessarily Never Good Enough New York No Idea No Work Not Afraid Note Obsessed Older One Thing Ongoing Onscreen Open Open Space Open Spaces Opportunity Outfit Pages Paid Palate Parents Parents Love Parker Parts Peace People Period Periods Perishing Person Personal Personal Life Personally Peter Peter Parker Physique Picture Pirates Play Playing Plot Point Popular Powers Prep Present Presented Pressure Pretend Prevent Problem Prospect Public Punch Question Raised Rational Reaction Read Real Real You Really Great Really Smart Recognition Recognize Reference Rehearsal Relate Relieving Religion Relying Remember Resemble Response Rest Rest Of Your Life Review Role Roles Room Roots Saving Scenarios Scene School Scripts Secondary Self-Deprecating Self-Doubt Selfishness Sense Shake Show Shows Signed Sing Situation Situations Skinny Smart Spaces Special Stage Stakes Stars Starts Stems Stories Story Storyline Struggle Struggled Subway Superhero Superpowers Surface Sweat Systems Tales Tall Television Telling Tells Tempting Terrified Theory Thing Things Thought Time Times Traumatic Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Trip Turn TV Show TV Shows Unemployed Unemployment Unique Unprepared Valid Very Interesting Vigilante Violence Wait Wanted Watch Weight Weird Wide Wide Open Spaces Winning Wonderful Word Work Working World Writers Yeah York Young Less More Hide All See All
I'm grateful I know what it's like to be unemployed for long periods of time.
I left Britain in the mid-1990s when TV was going down the cundy - another good Dundee word - because I wanted a film career. But as I get older, I find myself being drawn back to my roots, and I'm loving it.
I don't think I make decisions as an actor based on what I think the fans will or will not want at this point. — © Charlie Cox
I don't think I make decisions as an actor based on what I think the fans will or will not want at this point.
I'm a London lad, but I'm fascinated by America. I want to take a motorcycling trip across the country and see those wide open spaces.
I think the danger is to try and please everyone.
There's something very special about seeing history so clearly in front of you through that architecture that you just don't get in the U.S. If I was asked to choose where I'd most like to live, I would always choose London.
I love New York, but I have to admit that I feel very English, and I do miss that sense of history that you have everywhere in Britain.
Claire Danes is lovely and a really great actress.
There is a horrible misconception that you can either act or not. But experience is everything.
I've struggled for confidence and had great doubts about myself. But, personally, I'm not riddled with guilt.
I've gone through long periods of time when there's no work for me. You wait for the next job to come along, and when it does, there's never a consideration about whether you do or don't do something.
It was weird. Like, people came up to me and knew me as Daredevil before any footage had come out. I remember a guy on the subway being like, 'You're Charlie Cox. You're Daredevil.' And I was like, 'Yeah...?' I was barely Daredevil. I hadn't even signed the contract, you know?
I think that Matt Murdock, the way he kind of holds himself, he's quite sensible at times, and he's quite serious. I think he would admire Captain America - not that he wouldn't admire Iron Man, but I think he probably be a little put off by his grandiosity.
You can have the most emotional moment as an actor, ever, and many people would be like, 'Okay, cool. What's next?' You land one punch in a fight scene, and everyone is like, 'Yeah!'
I don't think I resemble a superhero at all, really. I don't think people would really imagine me to be a superhero. I certainly don't have the physique for it, and I'm not tall enough, etc.
The great thing about doing a play is you get this rehearsal period, which you don't get with most film and television roles. — © Charlie Cox
The great thing about doing a play is you get this rehearsal period, which you don't get with most film and television roles.
What I like about fairy tales is that they highlight the emotions within a story. The situations aren't real, with falling stars and pirates. But what you do relate to is the emotions that the characters feel.
I don't feel comfortable with the glorification of violence. But, as an actor who has had long periods of unemployment, you have to be lenient with your convictions.
Of all the London theatres, the Donmar is the dream.
My reaction when I hear the word 'celebrity' is, 'Who, me?' It doesn't feel like I'm famous.
'The Theory Of Everything' was a charming story, but I never dreamed it would turn out the way it did, winning all sorts of awards, and I don't think anybody working on it did.
If you want to play a complex, turmoiled character, then give him a dose of Catholicism.
I love to do cardio. I like to run and sweat a lot, and I think that's quite helpful.
I never don't know my lines. I never take the audition pages into the room. I end up relying on them or looking at them too much, and it makes me feel unprepared, so I always learn my lines without fail.
Sometimes you think about the job that we, as actors, do. I take it very seriously, and I care very much about it, but I'm paid to make believe. When you're a kid, you go to your friend's house, and it's, 'Let's pretend we're both cowboys!' Without belittling it, that's basically what I do - I tell stories.
With every job I watch, I can't find peace with what I've done. It's never good enough in my mind. I will never be happy if I'm in that mindset, unless I get a review that starts: 'Once in a generation.'
I'd love to play Spiderman, but I'm definitely too old for that role now.
Mark Rylance is one of my heroes. I saw 'Jerusalem' four or five times, twice in New York, twice in London.
It's so easy to become obsessed with the film industry and recognition that we can forget that we are not saving the world. We are just actors trying to entertain people.
Daredevil's religion makes him unique. He's a vigilante, but he's also a lawyer - and all the while, he believes only God is capable of bringing people to justice.
I am incredibly self-deprecating. It stems from self-doubt.
When you get to set, you don't try to play the plot; you just play the character.
I was at a school in England, a prep school, from the ages of 8 and 13. And every play they did was a musical. Parents love musicals. And I don't sing. It was driving me crazy. 'We're doing 'Macbeth.' 'Yes!' 'The musical!' And I was always in the chorus, because of course, in all the main parts, you had to be able to sing.
I'd love to see Peter Parker and Daredevil hang out. There's a wonderful issue of the comics where Matt Murdock has to defend Daredevil, because the public don't know, and so he has Peter Parker put on his Daredevil outfit so that he can sit in the docks. You know, great storyline.
Fame terrifies me. I can say that with honesty. You're terrified that, when people know the real you, they won't like you. — © Charlie Cox
Fame terrifies me. I can say that with honesty. You're terrified that, when people know the real you, they won't like you.
One of the great things about playing a fallible superhero, one who doesn't necessarily have superpowers, is that the stakes are raised by the prospect of them perishing.
One of the difficulties for me is that I'm naturally very skinny, so the problem that I have is trying to keep weight on, put weight on. I have to eat six, seven times a day, and I have to have a lot of carbohydrates to try and fatten me up so I have something to turn into muscle.
I grew up Catholic, and when you've grown up, and these belief systems have been presented to you at a young, impressionable age, I don't know that you can shake them. Even if your rational mind tells you something else, sometimes they're so deeply ingrained that they are with you for the rest of your life.
I didn't grow up on comics, and I read very few.
Daredevil was known as 'The Man Without Fear,' and I just thought, 'Well, I don't think that's very interesting.' I don't think it's very interesting to watch someone who's incapable of feeling fear. It also removes from the palate my favorite character attribute, which is courage. If you're not afraid, you can't exercise courage.
There are elements to my faith which are echoed very closely in the scripts that come through. I read certain moments, and I'm able to say, 'Yes, I recognize that. I champion that. I ally myself to that idea.' Then there are times where I don't. My feeling is, at this stage in my life, that it will be an ongoing struggle.
I'm really grateful for the opportunity I had on 'Boardwalk Empire,' just because it was very different than anything I'd done onscreen.
I really fell into drama school - I had a lot of lot of luck. I didn't take criticism very well while I was there; in fact, I took it personally. With every note I got, I felt like they were telling me I was a bad person.
I love those moments in any movie or film where there's a reference to a bigger picture, especially in Marvel where everything is connected.
If the show encourages an audience to ask the question, "Is this character's emotional response to this situation valid?," then that's a really good question to ask.
We had no idea that this show [Daredevil] would be as popular as it was, but with the benefit of hindsight, one thing I can say is that I think that was a really, really smart move.
In other films and TV shows, we might say, "Well, they're just evil." In our show [Daredeval], we're trying to say, "There's bad actions, but not necessarily bad people."
It's very, very tempting to make a superhero film or show and make it about the powers. — © Charlie Cox
It's very, very tempting to make a superhero film or show and make it about the powers.
I was at a school in England, a prep school, from the ages of 8 and 13. And every play they did was a musical. Parents love musicals. And I don't sing. It was driving me crazy. 'We're doing 'Macbeth.'' 'Yes!' 'The musical!' And I was always in the chorus, because of course, in all the main parts, you had to be able to sing.
What the writers do, and we hopefully can bring to life, is that they present characters who, on the surface, aren't always heroic and their acts aren't always devoid of selfishness.
When you think about justifiable anger in one's personal life, we look at those scenarios in everyday life and through our story with a superhero, we heighten them.
All we can do now is try to prevent secondary damage by relieving pressure on the brain caused by the initial injury. There is no reparative treatment for traumatic brain injury.
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