Top 60 Quotes & Sayings by Chris Pronger

Explore popular quotes and sayings by a Canadian hockey player Chris Pronger.
Chris Pronger

Christopher Robert Pronger is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey defenceman and a former advisor to the Florida Panthers of the National Hockey League (NHL).

Explore Chris Pronger Quotes About

Ability Accused Activities Appointment Asked Assistant Athletes Back Bad Things Bad Things Happen Hide All Barely Beard Beast Beer Behind The Scenes Best Things Best Things In Life Biggest Biggest Thing Blown Blurry Bother Bowls Breakfast Bring Bucket Bucket List Building Busy By-Product Call Cancer Care Career Carry Challenges Chance Change Circumstances City Claim Close Cognitive Cold Colon Colon Cancer Comfortable Coming Company Conference Connect Consistency Consistent Constantly Constraints Continue Corner Correct Couple Culture Days Deal Decide Deep Defense Degrees Demands Dentist Deny Diagnosed Difficult Dig Deep Dinner Doctors Down The Road Dreams Drinks Drive Dying East Eastern Easy Eating Eating Right Edmonton Eliminate Elite Elite Athletes Email Emotions Excited Executives Eyes Faces Families Family Fans Father Feel Feel Good Feeling Fickle Figure Figured Find Fine Finish Fixed Focus Focusing Fold Fond Fond Memories Forces Fortunate Forward Friend Friends Front Game Games Gave Get Back Giving Glasses Go Home Goal Goals Gold Gold Medal Gold Medals Good Good Luck Good Team Governors Great Great Opportunity Gretzky Grew Grow Growing Growing Up Guys Hall Hall Of Fame Happen Happened Hard Head Headache Headaches Health High High Note Hockey Holding Hole Home Homework Hook Hours Hull Hurt I Realized Idea Indecision Ingrained Intentional Interested Internet Invested Involved John June Junior Just Kind Kids Kind Knew Knowing Last Night League Learn Learned Leave Life Line List Live Logic Lose Loud Loud Noises Louis Love Luck Luxury Make Makes Makes You Stronger Management Medals Media Meet Memories Mental Mental Breakdown Mentor Message Michigan Middle Middle Of Nowhere Mindset Minutes Miss Missing Mistake Mistakes Mistakes Happen Moment Moustache Move Move Forward My Life My Time My Wife Nature Needed Nervous Night Nights Noise Noises Note Old Eyes Opportunity Our Family Our Time Outdoor Overcome Overload Owners Pain Peach Penalty People Perfect Perfect For Me Peripheral Peripheral Vision Philadelphia Physical Physicality Place Play Played Player Playing Playing Hockey Playoffs Point Pounding Practice Prepare Pressures Pretty Pretty Good Product Professional Progress Proportion Puck Pull Punishment Purposeful Pursuing Push Quickly Quiet Raise Rarely Read Realized Refs Related Relax Remember Remembered Requests Rest Retire Rhythm Right Back Right People Rink Road Room Rough Routine Scenes Schedule School Secret Send Sense Sensory Shoes Shoot Shot Shut Sick Sideways Significance Sitting Situation Sixth Sixth Sense Skills Slept Small So-Called Social Social Media Softer Space Speak Speed Split Sport Spur Spur Of The Moment St. Louis Stage Stanley Stanley Cup Start Started Stay Step Stick Strong Stronger Struggles Stuff Stuff Happens Substance Suggestions Suite Super Super Bowl Suspect T Pain Table Takes Taking Talking Team Team Win Teams Teeth Terms Thing Things Things Happen Things In Life Time Time And Space Times Tough Town Traded Trademark Travel Travel The World Travels Trip Trips Tumble Turned Turns Twists Twists And Turns Two Years Understand Upbringing Vacation Vendetta Very Good Video Video Game Video Games Vision Wanted Wanting Watch Watching Wayne Wearing Weekend West Wheeling Wife Wins Woke Work Work Out Working World Worried Worrying Write Wrong Year Years Less More Hide All See All
I get to play behind Al MacInnis and learn from him. I get to play with Brett Hull. There were like six or seven Hall of Famers that I would play with during my time in St. Louis. I mean, Wayne Gretzky was traded there my first year.
Getting traded to Edmonton was fine with me at the time. At the end of the day, though, you just try to do what's best for you and your family.
It takes nothing to get me to sensory overload. — © Chris Pronger
It takes nothing to get me to sensory overload.
When you have just a beard and no moustache, it's not good. But when I do grow my peach fuzz, the girls seem to swarm a lot more.
Everybody wants to go out like a John Elway, where he wins two Super Bowls and is able to retire on his own terms.
Fans are fickle, it's the nature of the beast.
A lot of guys are missing teeth and don't get them fixed until they're done. I think that's pretty much the hockey trademark... guys figure, well, we're going to lose our teeth anyway, so we'll get them fixed when we're done.
The best things in life aren't easy. My career kind of sums that up. From the start of it to the end of it, there were a lot of twists and turns, a lot of different adversities. Having overcome those, it makes you stronger.
I get up, I have breakfast, go work out, go to my eye appointment, come home, relax for a couple hours, and then go get my kids from school and start carpooling them around to their different activities and things they do.
I have nothing bad to say against the city of Edmonton. I liked it there. I had a fun year playing. It's something I'll remember for the rest of my life.
As social media grew and people learned of our travels, my wife would get requests from friends for suggestions about their travels. So she would help them connect with the right people and set up the right trip.
We are a boutique luxury travel company that caters to elite athletes and C-suite executives who feel the same pressures and time constraints as elite athletes. Having been one, I understand the pressures and the demands on your time.
I don't have very good peripheral vision, that so-called sixth sense people have. I used to have a really good one, and now I couldn't feel anybody come around a corner.
When my wife was six years old, her father was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer and was given a 10% chance to live. He wanted to travel the world with his family while he could, so on these trips she got to see her father be excited to be with the family.
Everybody that has ever played a professional sport would like to go out on their terms and very few get to.
I'm from the middle of nowhere. I had to drive four hours just to find a city. It's a different upbringing. It was perfect for me. I love the small-town feel, where you know everybody.
You miss the routine. That's the biggest thing. That's probably the biggest thing that put me into a hole, that you don't have a routine, you don't get up and work out and then eat and then go to the rink and practice an all those things in a set schedule.
If I knew the secret to consistency, I'd be consistent. — © Chris Pronger
If I knew the secret to consistency, I'd be consistent.
Look, I think playing the way I played, and knowing the game the way I know it, I think I'm going to have a better idea as to what the mindset of each player was.
Mistakes happen. Not every one of my suspensions was purposeful or intentional. A lot of that stuff happens spur of the moment in the middle of a game.
I had a set schedule since I was 15, since I started playing junior hockey. When you don't have that sometimes you try to find something new and it's difficult.
Sometimes, I actually feel good when I get a penalty, because I get to rest for two minutes - hopefully just two minutes.
A lot of guys around the league might say I need a dentist.
Unless you're dying, it's ingrained in our culture to play. Pain doesn't hurt; it's just pain.
I don't like having noise swirling around me. Loud noises bother me, so I try to stick to the outside of a room. I try to keep the noise in front of me.
I didn't play the game to make friends; I played the game to win.
In the '90s, when I started, it was still a rough-and-tumble, physical league. You take the hook and holding and a little bit of the physicality out of the game, and the speed ratcheted up two-fold.
You want to be the guy to carry the Stanley Cup around and leave the game on a high note. As we all know that rarely happens.
I'm very interested one day in becoming a GM. I have a lot to learn and need to put some work in. But down the road at some point, under the right circumstances, it's definitely something I'm interested in pursuing.
I got a headache right now and you wouldn't know it. It's just a pounding. Back of the head. That's the thing. You get used to it.
And as you really dig deep and start talking to families about their goals, dreams and bucket list trips, you really get to know someone, which allows us to mentor them... and they start feeling comfortable with you.
My cognitive skills are a little suspect at times. It comes and goes on certain days. I can be sitting here and you might say what's wrong with him, and I'll figure out what I was saying and start going again.
I played to the best of my ability. Played to win and was fortunate enough to have won a Stanley Cup and a couple gold medals and played on some really good teams... I'm not going to look back and say I wish I could have done this or that.
Obviously, I played two years in Hartford and I have a lot of fond memories.
If I don't write things down, good luck. I was talking to my mom last night. I take another call, tell her I'll call right back, 10 minutes. Think I remembered?
Growing up, I ate, slept and breathed hockey. I got home from school, I shot pucks, played outdoor hockey, road hockey, go home for dinner... Remember this is pre-Internet, barely any video games, I had a Commodore Vic-20. If you weren't doing your homework, you were outside playing hockey, most likely.
I don't like having noise swirling around me. Loud noises bother me, so I try to stick to the outside of a room.
Whether the guys are nervous or just had mental breakdowns, it happens. The game is a game of mistakes. And how you deal with them and correct them and all the things like that is what makes this game great and makes hockey the sport it is.
I was still very invested in the team, very invested in how we were doing. I realized I needed to take a step back and start focusing on myself, my head and my eye, try to get my health back.
You have to close quickly, you have to eliminate time and space and you have to try to deny them the puck. When you're playing with it, it forces them out of their rhythm and forces them to play defense, which they obviously don't want to do.
It's not like you can start pounding drinks when you're wheeling your kids all over. They gave me something to shoot for, a goal to get back to. — © Chris Pronger
It's not like you can start pounding drinks when you're wheeling your kids all over. They gave me something to shoot for, a goal to get back to.
Every day, I'll get sent clips via email. I watch them and see if there's something of substance or significance.Some nights are super busy; some nights are quiet.
I wouldn't change anything that happened.That's the way the game was played when I was coming up. The game is different now. It's just a by-product of the era.
I'm not involved in any Philadelphia-related game or situation. When people claim I'm going to have a "vendetta" against every other Eastern Conference team I don't understand the logic: I'm not the one doling out the punishment.
As you've progress further in the Playoffs, the ice usually gets a little softer. It's tough to keep it that cold. We could make it hard, but it would be about 4 degrees in the building. I'm sure the fans wouldn't appreciate that very much, wearing parkas in June.
When I got hit I went from having 37-year-old eyes to having 65-year-old eyes. That's why I've got the glasses on - so my eye isn't constantly trying to focus and giving me headaches. But they also help me see better: my right eye is blurry.
I used to have very good sixth sense - knowing exactly where someone was without seeing them.
I've got to live my life. Bad things happen. I can't be sitting here worrying about it.
Mistakes happen. Not every one of my suspensions was purposeful or intentional. A lot of that stuff happens spur of the moment in the middle of a game. I think I can bring that to the table. Sometimes emotions get the best of you. Things happen.
[In management] you're getting an opportunity to meet and speak with the GMs, assistant GMs, owners, governors - all the way up the line. It's a great opportunity to understand the league a little better and the challenges it faces.
In the '90s, when I started, it was still a rough-and-tumble, physical league. You take the hook and holding and a little bit of the physicality out of the game, and the speed ratcheted up two-fold. Now you have a split second to make a hit, or decide to pull up. When there's indecision, you're going to make a mistake.
I was sitting at a friend's place in Michigan on vacation, having a beer on the patio. I was a little hefty. I said to myself: "Okay, I'm going to finish this weekend off strong, then after that I'm going to shut her down. I'm going to start taking better care of myself."
I wanted to stay in the game. I wanted to learn more about the league, what goes on behind the scenes. As a player, you don't really think about that, nor do you really care: you're worried about your job.
I have played in the West for 14 years. I played against Dustin Byfuglien a lot. So it's not like I've been out East for my whole career and never played against the guy. That may have been blown out of proportion, I think.
You do what you can to help your team win, whether it's playing that many minutes or 24 or whatever is asked of you, you do. You prepare yourself to play as much as you're asked to play.
I don't want to get into a 'he said, she said' with the refs...I'm the he. — © Chris Pronger
I don't want to get into a 'he said, she said' with the refs...I'm the he.
I think playing the way I played, and knowing the game the way I know it, I think I'm going to have a better idea as to what the mindset of each player was.
I just didn't feel very good. One day I woke up and I was like: "All right. I'm going to start eating right. I'm going to start working out." I figured it might help me feel a little bit better - even if I was still sick, it might help me move forward with my struggles. I just kind of turned a corner.
My doctors say the more I continue to push, the more I can continue to raise that bar, the better I can get.
You get a pretty good read by watching the play, and knowing what you would have done - having done most of the things that these guys are accused of doing. I put myself in their shoes: Would I have been wanting to send a message? Is it a hockey play that went a little sideways?
This site uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. More info...
Got it!