Top 38 Quotes & Sayings by Chuck Yeager

Explore popular quotes and sayings by an American aviator Chuck Yeager.
Chuck Yeager

Brigadier General Charles Elwood Yeager was a United States Air Force officer, flying ace, and record-setting test pilot who in 1947 became the first pilot in history confirmed to have exceeded the speed of sound in level flight.

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Acceleration Acting Afraid Agenda Air Force Airplane Alert All Kinds Assuming Astronaut Hide All Astronauts Attained Baby Back Back Up Barrier Began Best Big Mistake Born Bottom Break Break Through British Bunch Bureaucratic Causing Chamber Chance Chinese Choose Cockpit Combat Concentrate Continually Control Correct Crap Daily Dangerous Days Difference Differently Difficult Dime Don't Give Up Dozen Dropping Duty Dying Eagerness Emergency Enjoyed Equipment Everlasting Evidence Experience Fact Fanatic Faster Fear Feet Fighter Figure Finally Fine Finished First Time Flight Flights Flow Flown Fluctuate Flying Force French Fuel Give Goal Good Grandma Great Grow Guys Half Happening Hard Hard Work Have No Regrets High Horizontal I Realized Immediately Important In Fact Increased Iranian Item Japanese Kind Kinds Knowledge Knowledge And Experience Landing Learn Learning Learning Experience Lemonade Level Leveling Life Lifetime Linear Live Long Luck Machine Made Make Make Up Mess Military Minutes Mission Mistake Moment Moment Of Truth My Life NASA Natural Needle No Control No Regrets Nose Noticed Obsession One Thing One Word Outcome Outstanding Pakistani Paramount Parts Passed People Percent Pick Picked Piece Pilot Pilots Prevent Priority Proficient Push Rapid Reached Reading Real Realized Reasons Regrets Remained Respectful Results Ride Risk Risks Rocket Rules Scale School Scientific Scientific Evidence Secret Secret Of My Success Shakes Shock Shoot Shooter Shot Simple Sipping Sitting Sitting Up Situation Skillful Smooth Sound Space Speculation Speed Started Stay Straight Success Success Is Suddenly Systems Talents Tells The One Thing The Secret Of These Days Thing Thirty Time Trained Trouble Truth Turned Turns Ultimate Ultimate Goal Unchanging Understand Very Good Wait Walk Waves Wings Wipe Word Work Works World Worth Years Less More Hide All See All
It wasn't that the X-1 would kill you, it was the systems in the X-1 that would kill you.
It's really difficult for fanatic churchgoers to understand God can't help me. I'm the only one who can help me.
If you want to grow old as a pilot, you've got to know when to push it, and when to back off.
I was always afraid of dying. Always. It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and my emergency equipment, and kept me flying respectful of my machine and always alert in the cockpit.
You don't concentrate on risks. You concentrate on results. No risk is too great to prevent the necessary job from getting done.
When I was picked to fly the X-1, it was my duty to fly it, and I did.
What good does it do to be afraid? It doesn't help anything. You better try and figure out what's happening and correct it.
Never wait for trouble. β€” Β© Chuck Yeager
Never wait for trouble.
You do what you can for as long as you can, and when you finally can't, you do the next best thing. You back up but you don't give up.
If you can walk away from a landing, it's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing.
The one word you use in military flying is duty. It's your duty. You have no control over outcome, no control over pick-and-choose. It's duty.
There's no such thing as a natural-born pilot.
Most pilots learn, when they pin on their wings and go out and get in a fighter, especially, that one thing you don't do, you don't believe anything anybody tells you about an airplane.
Rules are made for people who aren't willing to make up their own.
In 1966, NASA took over in space, and it has been a bureaucratic mess ever since.
Later, I realized that the mission had to end in a let-down because the real barrier wasn't in the sky but in our knowledge and experience of supersonic flight.
I have flown in just about everything, with all kinds of pilots in all parts of the world - British, French, Pakistani, Iranian, Japanese, Chinese - and there wasn't a dime's worth of difference between any of them except for one unchanging, certain fact: the best, most skillful pilot has the most experience.
There is no kind of ultimate goal to do something twice as good as anyone else can. It's just to do the job as best you can. If it turns out good, fine. If it doesn't, that's the way it goes.
I don't think about life everlasting. If something doesn't have scientific evidence to back it up, I don't believe it. I'm a straight shooter. β€” Β© Chuck Yeager
I don't think about life everlasting. If something doesn't have scientific evidence to back it up, I don't believe it. I'm a straight shooter.
I have no regrets about my life. People ask, "If you had to do it all over again, would you do it differently?" No. That's speculation.
At the moment of truth, there are either reasons or results.
Just before you break through the sound barrier, the cockpit shakes the most. β€” Β© Chuck Yeager
Just before you break through the sound barrier, the cockpit shakes the most.
The best pilots fly more than the others; that's why they're the best.
The secret of my success is that I always managed to live to fly another day.
The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down.
After about 30 minutes I puked all over my airplane. I said to my self, "Man, you made a big mistake."
There is no such thing as a natural born pilot. Whatever my aptitudes or talents, becoming a proficient pilot was hard work, really a lifetime's learning experience. For the best pilots, flying is an obsession, the one thing in life they must do continually. The best pilots fly more than the others; that's why they're the best. Experience is everything. The eagerness to learn how and why every piece of equipment works is everything. And luck is everything, too.
At 42,000' in approximately level flight, a third cylinder was turned on. Acceleration was rapid and speed increased to .98 Mach. The needle of the machmeter fluctuated at this reading momentarily, then passed off the scale. Assuming that the off-scale reading remained linear, it is estimated that 1.05 Mach was attained at this time.
Leveling off at 42,000 feet, I had thirty percent of my fuel, so I turned on rocket chamber three and immediately reached .96 Mach. I noticed that the faster I got, the smoother the ride. Suddenly the Mach needle began to fluctuate. It went up to .965 Mach - then tipped right off the scale ... We were flying supersonic. And it was a smooth as a baby's bottom; Grandma could be sitting up there sipping lemonade.
That to me is a bunch of crap trying to shoot guys up into damned space. What they're going to do is they're going to wipe out half a dozen people one of these days, and that will be the end of it.
You concentrate on what you are doing, to do the best job you can, to stay out of a serious situation. That’s the way the X-1 was.
Unfortunately, many people do not consider fun an important item on their daily agenda. For me, that was always a high priority in whatever I was doing. β€” Β© Chuck Yeager
Unfortunately, many people do not consider fun an important item on their daily agenda. For me, that was always a high priority in whatever I was doing.
Everybody that I've ever seen that enjoyed their job was very good at it.
It's your duty to fly the airplane. If you get killed in it, you don't know anything about it anyway. Duty is paramount. It's that simple if you're a military guy. You don't say 'I'm not going to do that - that's dangerous.' If it's your duty to do it, that's the way it is.
All that I am ... I owe to the Air Force.
As we went through mach one, the nose started dropping, so we just cranked that horizontal stabilizer down to keep the nose up. We got it above mach one, and once we got it above the speed of sound, then you have supersonic flow over the whole airplane, so you have no more shock waves on it that are causing buffeting...You really don't think about the outcome of any kind of a flight, whether it's combat, or any other kinds of flights, because you really have no control over it.
Hey Ridley, that Machometer is acting screwy. It just went off the scale on me.
I ran the astronaut school for six years, and I was the commandant and when I finished in '65, 26 of my guys went into space as NASA astronauts that I trained.
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